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Other Poets
Poets on this site without biographical entries elsewhere1
其他詩人
 

This began as a page to centralize information about poets who have relevant lyrics in such collections as Yuefu Shiji, Taigu Yiyin or Qinshu Daquan but who are not introduced in any of the qin biographies. There are additional entries about poets for whom I have found relevant lyrics elsewhere.

  1. 鮑溶 Bao Rong (fl. ca. 820)
    Bao Rong (ICTCL, p.53) was a late Tang "master of the lyric and lofty"
    Lyrics for
    Qiu Si in Caishi Wu Nong (but it is not one of those set for qin)
    His Xiangfei Lienü Cao mentions qin
    The earliest reference for movable guzheng bridges at 42894.56 雁柱 yanzhu is Bao Rong's 風箏詩 which includes the line, "雁柱虛連勢,鸞歌且墜空。" (poem also mentions se, but not qin).

  2. 鮑照 Bao Zhao (ca. 414 - 466)
    Bao Zhao is discussed in
    QSCB, 4B. ICTCL, p.649, says: "the most important yuefu poet of the Six Dynasties (another name for the Northern and Southern Dynasties) and one of the most famous masters of yuefu in the whole of Chinese literary history." The YFSJ index includes 37 titles under his name (in 24 of the folios: 24, 27, 28, 29, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 44, 51, 55, 57, 58, 61, 63, 64, 65, 66, 68, 70, 76, 84 and 86). Poems specifically connected to qin or qin melodies include:

    - Lyrics for Bie Gu Cao
    - Youlan Cao (four short lyrics)
    - Zhi Zhao Fei Cao

    Perhaps due to the You Lan poems he is sometimes connected to the ancient melody You Lan. I do not know of any other evidence to support such a claim.

  3. 岑參 Cen Shen (715 - 770)
    Cen Shen (ICTCL, p.798), also called Cen Can, was a scholar official who traveled with 高仙芝 Gao Xianzhi on his military campaigns to Central Asia. Though best known for his ballads describing the rugged and harsh conditions in Central Asia, he also wrote many on more standard topics. His poem Fisherman (Sunflower Splendor, p.44) captures nicely the mood of
    Yu Ge. Those that specifically mention qin include:
    - On an Autumn Evening Listening to Mountain Recluse Luo Play Sanxia Liu Quan
    - The Qin Terrace of Fu Zijian (Preface, and three poems)

  4. 陳羽 Chen Yu (fl. ca.800)
    Chen Yu (Bio/1330)
    Lyrics for
    Xiangfei Yuan

  5. 崔顥 Cui Hao (d.754)
    Cui Hao (d. 754; Bio/2169), from 州汴 Bianzhou
    Lyrics for
    Huo Jiangjun, Melody of Ms. Lu

  6. 崔塗 Cui Tu (9th/10th c.)
    Cui Tu (Bio/2163), style name 禮山 Lishan; from 江南 Jiangnan
    Lyrics for
    You Lan

  7. 段克己 Duan Keji (1196-1254),
    Duan Keji was a poet from Shanxi under the Jin and Yuan dynasties; his poems were published together with those of his younger brother 段成己 Duan Chengji (1199-1282). For details see the English abstract of 譚寶芝,段克己(1196-1251)及段成己(1199-1282)詞研究 (Tam Po-chi, A study of the CI Poetry of Duan Keji [1196-1251] and Duan Chengji [1199-1282]). The complete collection,
    online as of 2010) has several poems that mention qin.
    Reference under Liang Xiao Yin (from 9/263: 中秋之二:良宵方喜故人共,醉語那知鄰舍驚).

  8. 傅玄 Fu Xuan (217 - 278)
    Fu Xuan was "the preeminent Confucian theorist of the Western Jin period," and "his poetry is notable for its influence on later major poets." (ICTCL, pp.391/2). QSCM includes his 琴敘
    Qin Xu, but it survives only through later quotes. He is also said to have written a 琴賦 Qin Fu
    His lyrics called 豔歌行 Yan Ge Xing concern the Luofu story (see Moshang Sang)

  9. 顧況 Gu Kuang (c.725 - c.814)
    Gu Kuang (ICTCL p.486) was a painter, poet and calligrapher from Suzhou whose sarcastic wit led him to his early retirement from public office; he then lived out his life at 茅山 Maoshan, a famous Daoist center; references here include:
    Cai Shi Wunong
    Wu Ye Ti
    Long Gong Cao (lyrics)
    Qin Ge (lyrics)
    QSDQ, 20A, #23 and #24
    QSDQ, 20B, #14 and #15

  10. 顧野王 Gu Yewang (6th c. CE)
    44649.201 顧野王字希馮 Gu Yewang, style name Xifeng, from 吳 Wu, lived during the 梁 Liang (505-557) and 陳 Chen (557-588) dynasties.
    Lyrics for
    Yang Chun Qu

  11. 貫休 Guan Xiu (832 - 912)
    Guan Xiu, Buddhist monk (ICTCL p.509)
    Lyrics for
    Bai Xue
    see also QSDQ, Folio 19B, #20 and Folio 20B, #48,

  12. 郭震 Guo Zhen (656-713)
    Guo Zhen (40338.343;
    Wiki focuses on his government career), was better known by his literary name 元振 Yuanzhen. He was (Giles:) a handsome man who married a daughter of 張嘉貞 Zhang Jiazheng (later Minister of State) by picking her out from behind a screen. Zhang went to Turfan on a mission from Empress Wu, then served also as a minister of state. He has four entries in YFSJ; none are in the qin section, but two connect to qin titles.
    Chun Jiang Qu (Folio 77, p. 1081, has his original lyrics, slightly changed in the qin melody)
    Wang Zhaojun  (Folio 29, p. 429 has his lyrics, but Zhaojun Yuan does not use them)

  13. 胡銓 Hu Quan (1102 - 1180)
    Hu Quan, nickname 胡澹菴 Hu Dan'an (ICTCL p.110)
    Qin-related poems are in QSCM,
    Folio 18, #27, Folio 19B, #150 and #151, and Folio 18, #117 to 119

  14. 皇甫冉 Huangfu Ran (715 - 768)
    Huangfu Ran, nickname 茂正 Maozheng (Bio/1744;
    Renditions)
    One of his qin-related poems is in QSCM, Folio 20B
    The text of another (from Complete Tang Poems) is included under Qin and Tea
    Two more poems of his are also mentioned on this site for their themes; see under Chun Si and Liangxiao Yin.

  15. 江洪 Jiang Hong (6th c.)
    Jiang Hong (Bio/xxx; 17496.179/2 梁,濟陽人 Liang dynasty, from Jiyang)
    Lyrics for
    Caishi Wu Nong, Qiu Feng

  16. 江奐 Jiang Huan (5th c.)
    Jiang Huan (17496.xxx; Bio/xxx; 齊江奐 49553xxx) was apparently a poet of 齊 Qi during the Southern Dynasties, but I have found out no more information about him.
    Yuefu Shiji has only the poem by him included here.
    Lyrics for Caishi Wu Nong, Lushui Qu

  17. 僧皎然 Jiaoran the Monk (730-799)
    Monk Jiaoran (23241.9/3 皎然) was the Buddhist name of the poet-monk 謝晝 Xie Zhou.
    See Nienhauser, Indiana Companion to Traditional Chinese Literature, pp.270-2; also
    Lu Yu and Li Ye, below.
    Lyrics in Yuefu Shiji (Folio 60, #7) for Feng Ru Song Ge

  18. 郎士元 Lang Shiyuan (8th c)
    Lang Shiyuan (ICTCL, p.277)
    Lyrics for
    Xiang Fei

  19. 李賀 Li He (791 - 817)
    ICTCL, p.536 (
    Wiki; Anchor Book)
    J. D. Frodsham (trans. and commentary), Goddesses, ghosts, and demons: the collected poems of Li He (790-816)
    J. D. Frodsham, The poems of Li Ho (791-817).
    This website mentions Li He in connection with:
      Lyrics for
    Xiang Fei
      Lyrics for Lushui Ci (applied to Section 4 of the qin melody Caishi Wu Nong)
      Lyrics for Huangzhong Diao
    Poems by Li He that mention qin include

  20. 李嶠 Li Jiao (644-713),
    Li Jiao (ICTCL p.531) "was an influential officer and a renowned man of letters during (690-710. His) poetry is characterised by the "Court Style" which had flourished in the Six Dynasties - many of his verses were also written at court. He is also well-known for his yongwu shi 詠物詩, poems on objects, which deal with an encyclopedic spectrum of subjects, from the sun, various musical instruments, and household items to flora and fauna...." References to him on this website include ones under
    Liangxiao Yin, Gu Yuan and Yu Qiao Wenda (see the quote from Su Shi's Yu Qiao Xianhua). Three of his yongwu shi mention the qin:

    1. 詠琴 Yong Qin (Declamation on the Qin)

    2. 詠風 Yong Feng (Wind)

      落日生蘋末,搖揚遍遠林。
      帶花疑鳳舞,向竹似龍吟。
      月動臨秋扇,松清入夜琴。 (...Pines clear through the evening qin.)
      若至蘭台下,還拂楚王襟。
    3. 詠市 Yong Feng (Towns) 闤闠開三市,旗亭起百尋。
      漸離初擊筑,司馬正彈琴。 (...Sima now plays the qin.)
      細柳龍鱗映,長槐兔月陰。
      徒知觀衛玉,詎肯掛秦金。

  21. 李頎 Li Qi (8th c.)
    Li Qi (14819.1463; ICTCL p.530) has several lyrics referenced on this site, including:

    Listening to the Great Dong Play the Hujia Sound
    Xiang Consorts

    Another related poem is his Qin Song (琴歌 Qin Ge, placed online and translated by Ying Sun as Deeply Moved by Music - here slightly modified):

    主人有酒歡今夕,   Tonight our host has prepared wine for a big feast.
    請奏鳴琴廣陵客。   He requests qin melodies from the Guangling guest.
    月照城頭烏半飛,   Startled by the moon, the crows on city walls scatter.
    霜淒萬樹風入衣;   The wind through frost-coated trees is piercingly bitter.
    銅鑪華燭燭增輝,   As the brass stove and candles warm up the crew,
    初彈淥水後楚妃。   First Lu Shui is played, then Princess Chu.
    一聲已動物皆靜,   The room turns quiet when he begins to play.
    四座無言星欲稀。   Not a word from the crowd until the stars fade away.
    清淮奉使千餘里,   The new order sends me a thousand miles to Qinghuai.
    敢告雲山從此始。   Suddenly I long for retirement to mountains in cloudy sky.

  22. 李清照 Li Qingzhao (1084 - ca.1151; 14819.1038)
    Li Qingzhao, nicknames 易安居士 Yi'an jushi and 樕玉 Suyu, was a major Song dynasty poet. Biographical information is readily available online. She was a daughter of the distinguished literatus 李格非 Li Gefei, and the wife of another literatus and senior official, 趙明誠 Zhao Mingcheng. The marriage was apparently a happy one. Originally from the Jinan region of Shandong province, she and her husband moved south in 1127 as the Northern Song dynasty was collapsing. Her husband died shortly after this, after which her life was quite difficult.

    With regard to qin melodies, those on this site to which she has some connection include the following,

    Although Li Qingzhao is said to have written many poems, only a few have survived. Some sources put the number at about 50, but 65 are translated in Rexroth and Chung (see below and further details). Of note besides the poem set to Fenghuang Taishang Yi Chui Xiao is one of her poems to the tune 浣溪沙 "Silk Washing Brook" (translations also referenced below), which includes the line "倚樓無語理瑤琴 High in my chamber and without a word I play (lit. 'arrange') my jade (-studded) qin." This may suggest she herself played it.

    Relevant translations of Li Qingzhao's poems are in:

  23. 李群玉 Li Qunyu (813-860)
    A talented Hunan poet, he passed the official examinations but instead of pursuing high rank he remained in his home town to enjoy music, calligraphy, poetry and so forth. His poems are quoted under
    Wu Ye Ti and 昇仙操 Sheng Xian Cao; see also 琴心 Qin Xin.

  24. 李商隱 Li Shangyin (813-858)
    One of the most famous Tang poets (
    Wiki), from Henan. He wrote at least 15 poems that mention qin (q.v.). One particular quote from 李商隱雜纂殺風景 (not one of the above 15) says,

    「花間喝道,背山起樓,煮鶴焚琴,清泉濯足。」
    This is said to be the source of the expressions "焚琴煮鶴" and "燒琴煮鶴", i.e., "burn a qin to cook a crane": have no appreciation of culture, waste wonderful things.

    He is also mentioned in connection with "The sound of reading", but I have not yet found the source of that quote.

  25. 李冶 Li Ye (d.784 CE)
    Li Ye was a highly regarded courtesan-poet (some say Daoist nun) also called 李季蘭 Li Jilan (Bio/988). See
    Idema and Grant (pp. 176 - 182), and Chang and Saussy (pp. 56 - 59). In the latter, Stephen Owen writes that she

    "seems to have been well-known among the poetic groups of the Lower Yangzi region in the 760s and 770s (a poem by the poet-monk Jiaoran suggests that she made romantic as well as literary advances)....Of her eighteen extant poems, two are clearly spurious; however, twelve of the remaining sixteen were preserved in Tang anthologies, which is a good indication of her popularity." (Another friend was Lu Yu.)

    Idema and Grant translate nine of her poems, Owen translates four. Both books translate two poems that mention qin:
    - A Song on Listening to a Playing of Sanxia Liu Quan (the original is in both YFSJ [Folio 60, #6] and Qinshu Daquan [Folio 19B]).
    - Reproach from Mutual Love (the lyrics are later echoed in Xiangfei Yuan, see footnote there)

  26. 李之儀 Li Zhiyi (1038-1117)
    Nickname 姑溪居士; a poet and prose writer said to have attended the
    Elegant Gathering in the Western Gardens. His Poems of Guxi (姑溪詞 Guxi ci) include at least two that mention qin:

    江神女
    古宵莫惜醒顏紅。非常外,且安詳。須疑悲情,回想似旋威嚴。流浪海角頭黑也,罕見非,再相遇。
    十暮年北南感徵鴻。愛當同,甘沉沉。戚把憂懷,輕易即書空。只無琴樽堪寄小,除另外,絕蒿蓬。

    中江月
    昨日非常霜重,曉來千里書傳。吳山秀處洞庭邊,不夜星垂始遍。
    佳事寄來禪侶,少情將收琴仙。為憐好因稱嬋娟,一哭談歸媚眼。

  27. 梁,簡文帝 Liang Emperor Jianwen (503 - 551; r. 550 - 551)
    Details under his birth name, 蕭綱 Xiao Gang

  28. 令狐楚 Linghu Chu (766 – 837)
    Linghu Chu (
    Wiki), coming from a distinguished family and having close imperial connections, was a senior civil and military official during the reign of several emperors. He is said to have been a brilliant writer but most of his writings are lost. The 全唐詩 Complete Tang Poems has 86 poems attributed to him (includes those in YFSJ).
    Three of the nine poems attributed to him in Yuefu Shiji are his lyrics for You Chun Ci in in Caishi Wunong.

  29. 柳辯 Liu Bian (Sui dynasty)
    "Bian" is actually written 柳, but 36236 says this is a form of 辯 created during the 北齊 Northern Qi period (just before Sui). 15002.161 says Liu Bian was a grandson of 柳惔 Liu Yan, and that his style name was 顧言 Guyan. YFSJ calls him 柳顧言 Liu Guyan
    Lyrics for
    Yang Chun Qu

  30. 劉基 Liu Ji (1311 - 1375; Wiki; image and further details under Kechuang Yehua)
    Liu Ji (ICTCL, pp. 574-6; compare 劉籍 Liu Ji), style name 伯溫 Bowen, nickname 郁離子 Youlizi (Master of Refined Enlightenment), "born into a family noted for military...and scholarly achievements", was himself a noted essayist and poet who originally worked for the Yuan government, but also criticized them, eventually becoming one of the main advisors of Zhu Yuanzhang (1328 - 1399) during his campaign to overthrow the Yuan; Liu continued as an advisor and official after Zhu became the founding emperor of the Ming dynasty. Over time, and especially during the Qing dynasty, his importance was gradually magnified, with many forged writings such as the Shaobing Ge saying he had predicted numerous events that occurred during and after his lifetime. For a detailed account see Hok-Lam Chan. Legends of the Building of Old Beijing, pp. 138-155.

    ICTCL mentions an essay by Liu Ji about a Craftsman Zhichao (工之僑) making a qin with such a wonderful sound that he presented it to a high official. However, the official, saying it wasn't old, returned it. Zhichao then redid the lacquer adding false cracks, carved into it some characters with seal writing, then put it in a box and buried it for a while. After this people thought it was old and so valued it greatly. The original text is as follows:

    工之僑得良桐焉,斫而為琴,絃而鼓之,金聲而玉應。自以為天下之美也,獻之太常。使國工視之,曰:「弗古。」還之。 工之僑以歸,謀諸漆工,作斷紋焉;又謀諸篆工,作古窾焉。匣而埋諸土,期年出之,抱以適市。貴人過而見之,易之以百金,獻諸朝。樂官傳視,皆曰:「稀世之珍也。」 工之僑聞之,嘆曰:「悲哉世也!豈獨一琴哉?莫不然矣!而不早圖之,其與亡矣。」遂去,入於宕冥之山,不知其所終。

    Several of Liu Ji's poems apparently mention qin (e.g. in phrases such as "援琴奏將歸" and "玉琴奏瑤席") but I am not sure of the details within the context of much attributed to him being unreliable.

    Liu Ji has been connected with the melodies Kechuang Yehua, Daming Yitong and Chun Yu, but all the connections are tentative and/or peripheral.

    Joseph Lam, State Sacrifices, pp.6-7, quotes a description by Liu Ji of a state sacrifice.

  31. 劉兼 Liu Jian (8th c.)
    Although
    one webpage has over 70 poems attributed to him, saying he was from Chang An and became 宮榮刺史 Censor at Rongzhou, I can find no direct biographical entries (2270.628xxx; Bio/xxx) and online I have found conflicting information about whether he was Tang dynasty (earning his 進士 jinshi during 天寶 742-56), Five Dynasties, or early Song (). A footnote to Peaceful Evening Prelude (Liangxiao Yin) quotes his Crabapple Flower Poem (海棠花詩 Haitang Hua Shi) for its mention of a peaceful evening.

    The 70 online poems include seven that mention qin, as follows:

    1. 春宵
      春雲春日共朦朧,滿院梨花半夜風。宿酒未醒珠箔卷,艷歌初闋玉樓空。
      五湖范蠡才堪重,六印蘇秦道不同。再取素聊假寐,南柯靈夢莫相通。

    2. 春晚閒望
      東風滿地是梨花,只把心殢酒家。立處晚樓橫短笛,望中春草接平沙。
      雁行斷續晴天遠,燕翼參差翠幕斜。歸計未成頭欲白,釣舟煙浪思無涯。

    3. 登樓寓望
      憑高多是偶汍瀾,紅葉何堪照病顏。萬疊雲山供遠恨,一軒風物送秋寒。
      鶴客歸松徑,橫笛牛童臥蓼灘。獨倚郡樓無限意,夕陽西去水東還。

    4. 命妓不至
      中難挑孰憐才,獨對良宵酒數杯。蘇子黑貂將已盡,宋弘青鳥又空回。
      月穿淨牖霜成隙,風捲殘花錦作堆。欹枕夢魂何處去,醉和春色入天台。

    5. 寄高書記
      齊朝慶裔祖敖曹,麟角無雙鳳九毛。聲價五侯爭辟命,文章一代振風騷。
      自寄陶家意,夢枕誰聽益郡刀。補袞應星曾奏舉,北山南海孰為高。

    6. 訪飲妓不遇,招酒徒不至
      小橋流水接平沙,何處行雲不在家。畢卓未來輕竹葉,劉晨重到殢桃花。
      樽冷落春將盡,幃幌蕭條日又斜。回首卻尋芳草路,金鞍拂柳思無涯。

    7. 登郡樓書懷
      煙雨樓台漸晦冥,錦江澄碧浪花平。卞和未雪荊山恥,莊舄空傷越國情。
      天際寂寥無雁下,雲端依約有僧行。登高欲繼離騷詠,魂斷愁深寫不成。
      邊郡荒涼悲且歌,故園迢遞隔煙波。聲背俗終如是,劍氣沖星又若何。
      朝客漸通書信少,釣舟頻引夢魂多。北山更有移文者,白首無塵歸去麼。
      莫嗔阮氏哭途窮,萬代深沉恨亦同。瑞玉豈知將抵鵲,鉛刀何事卻屠龍。
      九夷欲適嗟吾道,五柳終歸效古風。獨倚郡樓無限意,滿江煙雨正冥濛。

  32. 劉孝威 Liu Xiaowei (496 - 549)
    Liu Xiaowei (Bio/677), from 彭城 Pengcheng, during 梁 Liang
    See
    Si Gui Yin

  33. 劉禹錫 Liu Yuxi (772 - 842)
    Liu Yuxi (2270.583; ICTCL) , style name 夢得 Mengde, was from 徐州 Xuzhou (now in Jiangsu). After attaining his jinshi degree he became Censor in Chang'an, but because of "his participation in the Legalist-reform faction led by Wang Shuwen which sought to restrain the power of the eunuchs, local army commanders, and aristocratic families," he was sent into exile for 10 years in Hunan, then later again in Guangdong. He was important as an essayist as well as a poet. His poetry is said to have been influenced by his life amon non-Han minorities. YFSJ has his lyrics for the qin songs
    Fei Yuan Cao and Qiu Feng Yin, but no melodies survive. On the other hand, there are various qin settings for his poem Loushi Ming. The biography of Cui Caochang quotes one of his poems. And his poem Listening to a Qin is translated in HJAS 57, Ronald Egan, Music, Sadness and the Qin, p. 47.

  34. 劉長卿 Liu Zhangqing (c.710-after 787)
    Liu Zhangqing (also: Liu Changqing; style name 文房 Wenfang, nickname 隨州 Suizhou). ICTCL, p.572: "the most representative poet of the period immediately following that of the major High Tang figures.... Over 500 of Liu's poems are extant."
    - lyrics for
    Xiang Fei
    - poems in QSDQ: Folio 19B, #65, Folio 20A, #12, and Folio 20B, #9
    - a poem, called "彈琴 Playing the qin"; it is as follows (mostly following a translation by Ying Sun).

    泠泠七弦上,   The melody flows out from a seven-string qin,
    靜廳松風寒。   Quietly hearing "Wind in the Pines" brings a chill.
    古調雖自愛,   Although such old tunes are what I most adore,
    今人多不彈。   Today people seldom play them any more.

    This last poem is also sometimes said to begin 冷冷七絃上; as for line 2, Xu Hong mentions it as part of another poem by Liu. Although the most famous related qin melody is Wind through the Pines, at least one old list includes one called Quietly hearing the wind in the pines.

  35. 陸游 Lu You (1125 - 1210)
    Many poems by Lu You, "the most prolific lyric poet of the Southern Song dynasty", mention the qin: see separate entry.

  36. 盧照鄰 Lu Zhaolin ()
    Lu Zhaolin ()
    Lyrics for
    Mingyue Yin

  37. 邵雍 Shao Yong (1011 - 1077)
    Bio/1398; "one of the five masters of the Neo-Confucian Learning of the Way" (DeBary,
    Sources, Vol. 1, p. 678).
    QSDQ includes at least two poems by him about qin, Folio 19A, #22 and Folio 19B, #8
    The melody An Le Wo, in four sections, set to lyrics four of his poems, each beginning "In the Nest of Peace and Happiness...." (earliest is 1691; XII/584). The lyrics of the four sections begin:
        安樂窩中詩一編,自歌自詠自怡然....([7+7]x 10)
        安樂窩中一部書,號為皇極意何如....([7+7]x 10)
        安樂窩中一炷香,凌晨焚炷豈尋廠....([7+7]x 10)
        安樂窩中酒一樽,非惟養氣更怡眞....([7+7]x 8 because two lines omitted from middle)
    Shao Yong was sometimes also connected to the melody Yu Qiao Wenda

  38. 沈佺期 Shen Quanqi (c.650-713)
    Nienhauser, Companion, p.677, pairs him with 宋之問
    Song Zhiwen (d. 712), who wrote a poem about Wangzi Qiao (see Yao Tian Sheng He).
    Lyrics for Pili Yin

  39. 沈約 Shen Yue (441 - 513)
    Shen Yue, style name 休文 Xiuwen, "is probably best known as the originator of the first deliberately applied rules of tonal euphony in the history of Chinese prosody, though many have disputed this self-made claim." (ICTCL, p.680). YFSJ has over 50 entries under his name, but only two are in the qin section,
    Xiang Fei and Zhen Nü Yin. See also Yang Chun Qu, a Qiu Hong poem, Yu Yan, Xiao Yan and qin schools.

  40. 石崇 Shi Chong (249 - 300)
    Shi Chong (24574.619) of 晉 Jin was (ICTCL, p.962) part of a narrative tradition "telling stories of the ancient days in a language which is fairly ornate but lacks originality." He was a wealthy man with a villa in 金谷 Jin Gu (41049.281, a valley on the northwest side of Luoyang). Prominent people would gather here for elegant feasts involving music, art and poetry. In 300 a certain Sun Xiu accused Shi Chong of political intrigue and he was executed. Supposedly Sun Xiu had demanded Shi Chong's wife but Shi Chong refused; after his death the wife committed suicide there. As a result Jin Gu was used as an allusion to tenuous nature of wealth. See David Knechtges (trans.)
    Wen Xuan, III, p.202. Also ICTCL p. 962.
    Gu Yuan has an allusion to the story above.
    Preface and lyrics for Si Gui Yin
    Chu Fei Tan (YFSJ, p.435)

  41. 檀約 Tan Yue (5th c.?)
    15975.xxx; Diao: 約 27858.xxx. Bio/2564-5xxx (has one Tan with a qin connection: 檀翥
    Tan Zhu). No further information (YFSJ has only this one poem); if 齊 means Qi dynasty then he lived during 479-501.
    Lyrics for Yang Chun Qu

  42. 湯惠休 Tang Huixiu ()
    Tang Huixiu ()
    Lyrics for
    Qiu Feng, Chu Mingfei

  43. 王安石 Wang Anshi (1021-1086; Wiki)
    Wang Anshi (21295.361; ICTCL p.854; Giles; etc.) was a famous "reformer" strongly opposed by traditionalists (who suffered the consequences). His poems connected to the qin include,

    • A Hu Jia poem included in QSDQ, Folio 12 (QQJC, V/266; has the text). QSCB Chapter 6b1-2 reiterates what is said in Chapter 6a2 about Wu Liangfu setting these lyrics to qin, but there are no such surviving settings.
    • A poem connected to the Guqin Terrace in Wuhan.

  44. 王昌齡 Wang Changling (ca.690 - ca.756)
    ICTCL p.855
    He wrote a poem
    Listening to an Unadorned Qin.
    And is mentioned in connection with the melodies Dao Yi and Feng Ru Song.

  45. 王僧孺 Wang Sengru (465 - 522)
    ICTCL p. 944
    Lyrics for
    Xiang Furen

  46. 翁卷 Weng Juan (d. after 1214)
    Bio/1968; late Song dynasty poet from 溫州 Wenzhou. At least eight of his poems mention qin: 鲍使君闲居、酬友人、寄從善上人、送陳嘉父為彭澤主簿、送吉水包長官、送姚主簿歸龍溪、送趙明叔明府、贈熊鍊師。 (These are online, e.g.,
    here). One of these is translated by Jonathan Chaves in West Cliff Poems: The Poetry of Weng Chüan, as follows:

    贈焦鍊師         Sent to Alchemist Chiao

    松邊自掩扉, Beside the pines you shut your gate,
    賣藥罷方歸。 Just returned from selling medicines.
    教客認仙草, You teach visitors to recognize immortal herbs,
    笑人求紫衣。 Laugh at those who seek the "purple robe."
    惜琴眠處放, You love your lute so much, you sleep with it;
    玩易語時稀。 You read the Book of Changes, but cite it rarely.
    風說沅砂賤, I hear you find Yüan-hsia a vulgar place:
    閒身去欲飛。 Fully at leisure, perhaps you'll fly away.

    "Purple robe" refers to public office. Lute, of course, is qin. Some editions call it 贈熊鍊師 Sent to Alchemist Hsiung.

  47. 吳均 Wu Jun (469 - 520
    Wu Jun of 梁 Liang (Bio/1031), style name 叔庠 Shuxiang, was a well-known writer and poet from Zhejiang. He held official positions under the Qi and Liang dynasties, based in Nanjing. 玉臺新詠 (see Birrell,
    Jade Terrace), has 26 of his poems. Birrell's biographical note on Wu Jun says, "He did some editorial work on the Annals of the Qi Dynasty, but was dismissed for inaccuracies." Annals of Qi is 齊春秋 Qi Chunqiu. His Continuation of All Writings of the Qi dynasty (28646.85 續齊諧記 Xu Qi Jieji) is quoted in two references below. And he is also considered to have been one of the compilers of Xijing Zaji.

    Wu Jun wrote several books and poems mentioned on this site.

    1. Xu Qi Jieji; quoted for Wang Jingbo
    2. Bie Gu Cao (a poem on this theme)
    3. Cai Shi Wunong (sets a poem of his to lyrics)
    4. Tiantai Yin (also quotes Xu Qi Jieji)
    5. Zhi Zhao Fei

  48. 吳邁遠 Wu Maiyuan (5th c. CE)
    Wu Maiyuan (Bio/1056) lived under the Liu Song
    Lyrics for
    Chu Chao Qu,
    Yang Chun Ge

  49. 蕭愨 Xiao Que (6th c. CE)
    Xiao Que (32667.xxx; 11312.xxx; Bio/xxx; compare 32667.557 Bio/2105 蕭懿 Xiao Yi, d. 500 CE) has four entries in YFSJ, but I haven't found any biographical information yet. One of the poems is 飛龍吟
    Fei Long Yin. His poem Listening to a Qin is translated in Ronald Egan, Music, Sadness and the Qin (HJAS 57, p. 42).

  50. 謝眺 Xie Tiao (464 - 499)
    ICTCL pp.430-2 says he "is best known for the originality of his landscape poems....Traditional criticism favorably characterizes his style as spontaneous and rhythmically fluid." He was an official of Southern Qi, based in Jiankang (within modern Nanjing) and he also served across the river in what is now Anhui, but in the end the harsh politics of the time led to his arrest and execution.
    Declamation on the Qin
    With Wang Zhongcheng Hearing a Qin
    On New Pavilion Islet Parting from Fan Yun of Lingling (mentions Xiao and Xiang rivers)
    The melody Evening Talk by a Guest's Window mentions him at the beginning of Section 4

  51. 辛德源 Xin Deyuan (6th c. CE)
    Xin Deyuan (39495.111), a minor poet of the Sui dynasty; 8 poems in YFSJ
    Lyrics for
    Pili Yin, Yi Lan Cao, Cheng Lian

  52. 徐孝嗣 Xu Xiaosi (453 - 499)
    Xu Xiaosi (Bio/1951)
    Lyrics for
    Bai Xue Ge

  53. 閻朝隱 Yan Zhaoyin (Chaoyin?) ()
    Yan Zhaoyin ()
    Lyrics for
    Mingyue Ge

  54. 閻朝隱 Yang Juyuan (born 755)
    Yang Juyuan (Bio/863)
    Lyrics for
    Biegu Cao

  55. 虞集 Yu Ji (1272-1348)
    Yu Ji (Bio/2404; 33531.130; ICTCL p.111, etc), style name 伯生 Bosheng, nickname 邵菴 (邵庵?), death name 虞文靖 Yu Wenjing, a "Southerner and a major poet of the era, is generally considered the best prose writer of the Yuan"; he became a member of the Hanlin Academy. Some sources say he composed the melody
    Chun Jiang Qu. QSDQ poems by him connected to the qin are in Folio 18, #50 and Folio 19A, #34 and #110. See also under Guanghan Qiu.

  56. 庾信 Yu Xin (513 - 581)
    Yu Xin (Bio/2187), 字子山 style name Zishan, also known as 庾開府 . ICTCL p.942 says, "His poetry marked a culmination of the richly innovative Six Dynasties and served as a harbinger for the flowering of verse under the Tang." References include: poems about
    hearing a string break, playing qin and Qiu Sai Yin, Wu Ye Ti lyrics, a comment about Cao Man, his qin named Qing Ying, and a quotation regarding qin se.

  57. 張祜 Zhang Hu (?-ca. 853)
    Zhang Hu (Bio/1227 has three 張祐 Zhang You and one Zhang Hu, a Tang writer "sometimes mistakenly written Zhang You")
    Zhi Zhao Fei Cao
    Si Gui Yin
    Zhaojun Yuan / Longshuo Cao
    Intoning a Sima Xiangru Qin Song (see Sima Xiangru Qin Ge)

  58. 張祐 Zhang You
    References to Zhang You often actually mean Zhang Hu (
    previous, as in the commentary with a Tang Yin painting.

  59. 張籍 Zhang Ji (778 - ca.829)
    Zhang Ji (Bio/); YFSJ has 53 entries. These include
    Bie Ge Cao, Chun Jiang Qu and Wu Ye Ti Yin
    See also Qiu Jiang Yebo.

  60. 張說 Zhang Yue (663 - 730)
    Zhang Yue (
    Wiki), style name 道濟 Daoji or 說之, was also 燕文貞公 Duke Wenzhen of Yan. He was a senior government official as well as a respected literary figure. He is mentioned in the biography of Fan Gong. Zhang Yue's poetry with connections to qin includes,

    1. Playing a Qin Song to See off Yin Bu Que Yuan Kai
    2. 再使蜀道詩 (Again Passing the Road to Shu)

      眇眇葭萌道,蒼蒼褒斜穀。 (elsewhere begins 渺渺葭萌道,...)
      煙壑爭晦深,雲山共重複。
      古來風塵子,同眩望鄉目。
      芸閣有儒生,軺車倦馳逐。
      青春客岷嶺,白露搖江服。
      歲月鎮羈孤,山川俄反復。
      魚遊戀深水,鳥遷戀喬木。
      如何別親愛,坐去文章國。
      蟋蟀鳴戶庭,蠨蛸網琴筑

  61. 張仲素 Zhang Zhongsu (d. 819/20)
    Zhang Zhongsu (10026.322; Bio/1272), style name 繪之 or 繢之 Huizhi, was a Hanlin scholar and accomplished poet; YFSJ has 11 entries, including
    Chun Jiang Qu

  62. 鄭允端 Zheng Yunduan (ca. 1327 - 56)
    Zheng Yunduan (Bio/xxx; 40513.xxx), style name 正淑 Zhengshu (16611.xxx), was from a prominent family in Suzhou.
    Women Writers, p. 131, introduces her. Pages 136-7 translate her poem Listening to the Qin (聽琴 Ting Qin). In it the narrator is entranced by listening to a song three times. This may suggest an aesthetic concerning short melodies or songs.

  63. 朱靜庵 Zhu Jing'an (fl. 1450)
    Zhu Jing'an, also known as 朱令文 Zhu Lingwen, was originally 朱仲嫻 Zhu Zhongxian (Bio/; ) was from 海寧 Haining, northeast of Hangzhou. Her poem 染甲 Ran Jia Coloring My Fingernails (
    Women Writers, p. 156) mentions se, not qin (because of the rhyme).

  64. 朱淑真 Zhu Shuzhen (1063? - 1106)
    Bio/571;
    Women Writers, pp. 100 - 106. A female poet contemporary to Li Qingzhao, she was of "arguably equal importance" (Edwin Van Bibber-Orr, Ph.D. dissertation 2013); the major collection of her poetry is called Heartbreak Collection (斷腸集 Duanchang Ji; one copy was in Tieqintongjianlou Shumu)
    Her poetry that mentions qin includes:

    • Playing Qin on a Summer Evening (夏夜彈琴 Xia Ye Tan Qin)

    • Broken String Qin (斷絃琴 Duan Xian Qin) 嫁做商人婦,便惹寂寞深。
      獨行獨坐,鬢里暗銷春。
      《斷腸詞》,淚涔涔。
      古來女兒苦,夢亂醉千尊。
      與愁共舞,不敢約黃昏。
      空樓弄,斷絃琴。
    • 題余氏攀鱗軒《朱淑真傳》題為:《余氏攀鱗軒》。 瀟灑新軒傍琴岑,攀鱗勃勃此潛心。
      易驚誰羨葉公室,入夢當為傳說霖。
      變化一聲雷霆遠,騰凌千裡海波深。
      臥廬曾比崇高志,肯憶當時梁父吟。
    • 夏日作 東風迤邐轉南風,萬物全歸長養功。
      舜豈無心阜民俗,熏熏歌入五弦中。
    • 小閣秋日詠雨 疏雨洗高穹,瀟瀟滴井桐。
      潤煙生硯底,涼氣入堂中。
      翠鎖交竿竹,紅翻落葉楓。
      撫琴閒弄曲,靜坐理商官。
    • 早春喜晴即事 山明雪盡翠嵐深,天闊雲開斷翳陰。
      漠漠暖煙生草木,熏熏和氣動園林。
      詩書遺興消長日,景物牽情入苦吟。
      金鴨火殘香合盡,更調商羽弄瑤琴。
    • 春日雜書十首?其七 月篩窗幌好風生,病眼傷風淚欲傾。
      寫字彈琴無意緒,踏青跳菜沒心情。
    • 春晝偶成 默默深閨掩晝關,簡編盈案小窗寒。
      卻嗟流水琴中意,難向人前取次彈。
    • 寄大人二首其一 去家千裡外,飄泊若為心。
      詩誦<南陔>句,琴歌<陟岵>音。
      承顏故國遠,舉目白雲深。
      欲識歸寧意,三年數歲陰。
    • 寄大人二首其二 極目思鄉國,千里更萬津。
      庭闈勞夢寐,道路壓埃塵。
      詩禮聞相遠,琴樽誰是親?
      愁看羅袖上,長搵淚痕新。
    No translations as yet.

  65. 朱孝廉 Zhu Xiaolian
    Zhu Xiaolian (Bio/xxx; YFSJ has only this one entry)
    Lyrics for
    Bai Xue Ge

  66. 莊南傑 Zhuang Nanjie (Tang dynasty)
    31795.xxx; 2798.xxx; Bio/610xxx; no further info (but there are 5 YFSJ poems)
    Lyrics for
    Yang Chun Qu

  67. 鄒紹先 Zou Shaoxian
    (Bio/xxx)
    Lyrics for
    Xiang Furen

  68. 鄒祇謨 Zou Zhimo
    40445.51; Bio/1117: 鄒祇謨字許士號程村 Zou Zhimo, literary name Xushi, nickname Chengcun; from 江南武進 Wujin (today's 常州 Changzhou in Jiangsu) in Jiangnan; jinshi in 1658. He was "one of the most important and acknowledged masters of Ci-lyrics in the early Qing dynasty." (李有强
    Li Youqiang) Three of his poems are lyrics for melodies in Japanese handbooks:

    1. 離別難 Li Bie Nan (QQJC XII/201; two melodies)
    2. 華清引 Hua Qing Yin (QQJC XII/205)
    3. 月當廳 Yue Dang Ting (QQJC XII/209)

    Zou Zhimo's poems were originally published in 麗農詞 Li Nong Ci.

 
Footnotes (Shorthand references are explained on a separate page)

1. The plan is eventually to centralize onto one webpage all biographical entries for poets.
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